Contact Us

Unit 29 Mountheath Trading Estate,

Ardent Way,

Prestwich

Manchester UK

M25 9WE

enquiries@prestwichhydroponics.co.uk

We Accept

© 2017 by Prestwich Hydroponics

Sulfur (S)
Iron (Fe)
Manganese (Mn)
Zinc (Zn)
Magnesium (Mg)
Calcium (Ca)
Potassium (K)
Phosphorus (P)
Nitrogen (N)
Show More
SULFUR DEFICIENCY

Problem: A sulfur deficiency shows as all over yellowing of leaves (chlorosis).

This usually begins with the newer leaves and at first may look like a nitrogen deficiency.

The underside of the leaves may take on a pinkish red or orange colour. The buds on a flowering plant may start dying off.

Unlike most other deficiencies that cause chlorosis, a sulfur deficiency will start at the back of the leaf and move it's way forward as opposed to starting at the tips.

 

Solution: Check and correct your pH to make sure that your sulfur isn't being locked out. Sulfur moves slowly through the plant so it may take a few days after you fix the problem before you start noticing an improvement in your plant.

Leaf Color: 

  • Pale colour leaves

  • Yellow leaves - new growth

  • Yellow leaves - lower, older leaves

  • Yellowing between veins

  • Red or pink colour on leaves

 

Leaf Symptoms: 

  • Upper leaves / newer growth affected

  • Lower leaves / older growth affected

  • Yellowing between veins

  • Slow growth

 

Plant Symptoms: 

  • Slow growth

 

Other Symptoms: 

Buds not progressing

HELPFUL PRODUCTS

Epsom Salts
Essentials pH Meter
pH Down
Show More
Advanced Nutrients B52
Essentials pH Meter
pH Down
Show More
MAGNESIUM DEFICIENCY

Problem: A light green or yellow colouring will begin to show on the veins and edges of the lower & older leaves.

Magnesium is a mobile nutrient, which means that the plant can move it from old leaves to new leaves. 

If you don't react to it promptly, a magnesium deficiency can spiral out of control and cause your plant to lose a lot of lower leaves quickly. The plant will pull magnesium out of older leaves and bring them to the newer leaves. That's why a magnesium deficiency usually appears towards the bottom of the plant and on older, less important leaves.

The edges of the leaves may become yellow or bright green and may start feeling crispy to the touch. This crispiness around the edges is different from nutrient burn, which does not lighten the margins inside the leaves.

Sometimes you will also see light brown spotting within the margins or along the edges if the problem continues to get worse, though this may be partially due to other deficiencies which often happen alongside a magnesium deficiency.

Magnesium deficiencies are easy to prevent and fix once you know what to do.

 

Solution: Your plant may show signs of a magnesium deficiency if the pH at the roots is too low, especially in a hydroponics system. When the pH of your root zone is not in the correct range, your plant cannot properly absorb magnesium through the roots.

Therefore it is very important to maintain the correct pH (and make sure the pH does not get too low / acidic) in order to avoid a magnesium deficiency.

Growers using Coco usually need to supplement their plants with extra Calcium & Magnesium in addition to regular nutrients. Treating coco with Cal-Mag and supplying extra throughout your grow is recommended.

Please note: Once a magnesium deficiency is cleared up, the problem will stop spreading to other older leaves, usually within a few days. Please note that leaves which have been damaged by a magnesium deficiency will probably not recover or turn green, so you want to pay attention to other growth for signs of recovery.​

Leaf Colour: 

  • Edges appear brown or burnt

  • Pale colour leaves

  • Yellow leaves - lower, older leaves

  • Yellowing between veins

  • Veins of leaves stay green

  • Brown or dark spots

  • Mottling / mosaic pattern

 

Leaf Symptoms: 

  • Lower leaves / older growth affected

  • Leaf tips appear burnt

  • Leaf tips die

  • Yellowing between veins

  • Veins of leaves stay green

  • Spots

  • Mottling / mosaic

  • Old leaves dropping off

  • Twisted growth

  • Leaves curl under

  • Leaves curl upwards

  • Wilting / drooping

 

Plant Symptoms: 

  • Old leaves dropping off

  • Twisted growth

  • Leaves curl under

  • Leaves curl upwards

  • Plant wilting / drooping

HELPFUL PRODUCTS

CALCIUM DEFICIENCY

Problem: Calcium is an important nutrient which helps provide structure to the plant and helps it withstand stress.

A calcium deficiency can sometimes be difficult to diagnose since they are often accompanied by magnesium, iron, and/or other deficiencies.

Calcium moves relatively slowly through the plant (it is a semi-mobile nutrient), which means it tends to "stay put" after it's been given to a leaf. It tends to show up on leaves that are actively growing and getting some amount of light.

Calcium deficiencies most often show up in the newer growth and older leaves that are exposed to light, which means calcium deficiencies first appear on leaves where there's rapid vegetative growth.

If a plant is affected by a calcium deficiency for too long, it may begin to show the following symptoms due to the lack of calcium.

  • Stems become weak or flimsy and may crack easily

  • Stems become hollow or show inner signs of decay

  • Plant does not stand up well to heat

  • Flowers/buds do not develop fully, or development is slow

  • Roots appear weak or under-developed

  • In severe calcium deficiencies, parts of roots may even die off or turn brown

  • Roots are more susceptible to root problems like root rot

 

Most plants like high levels of calcium, so it is unusual to feed too much calcium when using normal amounts of nutrients and/or regular soil. There are not many known cases of calcium toxicity (too much calcium), however too much calcium can cause the plant to lock out other nutrients, so it's important not to go overboard.

Calcium deficiencies are more likely to appear when...

  • Growers using a higher EC water source

  • Growing in a medium that hasn't been supplemented with a calcium rich nutrient.

  • Too much potassium can also sometimes cause the appearance of a calcium deficiency

  • Outdoors - calcium deficiency is more likely to appear in acidic soil (below 6.2 pH)

 

Solution: Your plant may show signs of a calcium deficiency if the pH at the roots is too high or too low. That is  because when the pH of your root zone is incorrect, your plant cannot properly absorb calcium through its roots. Therefore the first step is to ensure that you have the correct pH for your growth medium.

After a calcium deficiency is cleared up, the problem (brown spots and unhealthy new leaves) will stop appearing on new growth, usually within a week. Please note that leaves which have been damaged by a calcium deficiency will probably not recover or turn green, so you want to pay attention to new growth for signs of recovery.

Leaf Color: 

  • Brown or dark spots

  • Mottling / mosaic Pattern

 

Leaf Symptoms: 

  • Upper leaves / newer growth affected

  • Leaf edges appear burnt

  • Leaf tips appear burnt

  • Leaf tips die

  • Yellowing between veins

  • Spots

  • Mottling / mosaic

  • Slow growth

  • Twisted growth

  • Abnormal growth

 

Plant Symptoms: 

  • Weak stems

  • Slow growth

  • Twisted growth

 

Root Symptoms: 

  • Brown

  • Slow growing

 

Other Symptoms: 

  • Buds not progressing

HELPFUL PRODUCTS

Canna Mono Calcium
Plant Magic Magne-Cal
Essentials pH Meter
Show More
IDENTIFY THE PROBLEM

The images below show examples of how leaves with specific deficiencies can look.

If your plants are showing symptoms that look like any of the example leaves, click the image to find out more

 
 
Canna Mono Iron 1L
Plant Magic Magne-Cal
Essentials pH Meter
Show More
IRON DEFICIENCY

Problem: An iron deficiency is usually seen first on bright yellow new leaves

The symptoms can sometimes appear alongside other nutrient problems or deficiencies. An iron deficiency is usually caused by problems with pH, though sometimes an iron deficiency can be triggered by a stressful environment and may clear up on its own after the period of stress is over.

Iron nutrient deficiency can look similar to a magnesium deficiency, but an iron deficiency will affect newer/upper/inner leaves, where a magnesium deficiency affects older/lower leaves.

Solution: Adjust pH to correct range to assure there is no iron lockout and give the right nutrients. true iron deficiencies can be caused by the removal or lack of iron, however, some other nutrient deficiencies can also cause an iron deficiency (such as magnesium and calcium) 

Leaf Colour: 

  • Pale colour leaves

  • Yellow leaves - new growth

  • Yellowing between veins

  • Veins of leaves stay green

Leaf Symptoms: 

  • Upper leaves / newer growth affected

  • Small inner leaves affected

  • Leaf tips die

  • Yellowing between veins

  • Veins of leaves stay green

  • Slow growth

  • Twisted growth

  • Abnormal growth

 

Plant Symptoms: 

  • Slow growth

  • Twisted growth

 

Other Symptoms: 

  • Buds not progressing

HELPFUL PRODUCTS

 
Canna Mono Trace Mix
Essentials pH Meter
pH Down
Show More
MANGANESE DEFICIENCY

Problem: Leaves may become yellow in between the veins, with mottled brown spots on the affected leaves. These brown dead patches may spread and eventually kill the leaf. Leaves may also shred and fall apart.

Overall growth of the plant may be stunted. With a manganese deficiency, the yellowing will begin at the base of the leaves and move outwards towards the tips.

 

Solution: Your plant may also exhibit signs of a manganese deficiency if the pH is too high, or if the plant is getting too much iron.

After a manganese deficiency is cleared up, the brown spots and yellowing leaves will stop spreading to other growth usually within a week. Leaves which have been damaged by a manganese deficiency will probably not recover or turn green, so you want to pay attention to other growth for signs of recovery.​

If you suspect your plant has a manganese deficiency, flush your system with clean, pH'd water that contains a regular dose of nutrients that includes manganese. This will remove any extra iron or nutrient salts that may be affected the uptake of manganese, it will help restore pH to the proper levels, and will supply the plant with any missing nutrients.

You are looking to avoid higher pH ranges, as this is where manganese deficiencies are most likely to occur.

Leaf Colour: 

  • Pale colour leaves

  • Yellow leaves - new growth

  • Yellow leaves - lower, older leaves

  • Yellowing between veins

  • Veins of leaves stay green

  • Brown or dark spots

  • Mottling / mosaic pattern

 

Leaf Symptoms: 

  • Upper leaves / newer growth affected

  • Lower leaves / older growth affected

  • Yellowing between veins

  • Veins of leaves stay green

  • Spots

  • Mottling / mosaic

  • Slow growth

  • Abnormal growth

 

Plant Symptoms: 

  • Slow growth

HELPFUL PRODUCTS

 
ZINC DEFICIENCY

Problem: With a zinc deficiency, younger leaves start yellowing in between the veins. Leaf tips get discoloured and start dying. The leaves may take on a unique banded appearance and the plant may stop growing vertically. There may be much less space between new nodes, which can cause new leaves to start bunching together. If the plant is budding, its flowers may stop growing or even start dying if the problem isn't corrected.

 

Solution: Sometimes a zinc deficiency (like all deficiencies) can be triggered by stressful conditions and may clear up on its own after the period of stress is over. However, to minimise damage it's important to react to any growing problem as quickly as possible, especially in the flowering stage.

Adjust pH to correct range to avoid a zinc lockout and make sure to give the right nutrients. Avoid a heavy dosing of zinc, as this can create further problems, the best approach is to feed plants with mix of chelated trace elements such as zinc, iron, and manganese.

Leaf Colour: 

  • Yellow leaves - new growth

  • Yellowing between veins

  • Mottling / mosaic pattern

  •  

Leaf Symptoms: 

  • Upper leaves / newer growth affected

  • Leaf tips appear burnt

  • Leaf tips die

  • Yellowing between veins

  • Mottling / mosaic

  • Slow growth

  • Twisted growth

  • Leaves curl under

 

Plant Symptoms: 

  • Slow growth

  • Leaves curl under

  • Too short

 

Other Symptoms: 

  • Buds not progressing

HELPFUL PRODUCTS

Canna Mono Magnesium
Plant Magic Magne-Cal
Essentials pH Meter
Show More
 
 
Ecothrive Charge
BioBizz Fish Mix
Essentials pH Meter
Show More
POTASSIUM DEFICIENCY

Problem: With a potassium deficiency, symptoms generally appear on older leaves, however, this is not always the case. Sometimes the symptoms appear at the top of the plant on newer growth. Leaves with a potassium deficiency tend to get yellow, brown, or show signs of burn around the edges and tips. The burnt edges may look a little like nutrient burn, except the affected leaves also start turning yellow in the margins.

whether you notice the burnt edges or the yellowing first, when the leaf symptoms are both present, it's a good sign you have a potassium deficiency in your plants.

Plants may stretch and stems may become weak, but leaf symptoms are more noticeable. The leaf symptoms appear somewhat similar to an iron deficiency in that they can turn bright yellow, but the tips of the leaves curl as the edges turn brown, burn and die.

Despite the leaves looking burnt, the inside veins almost always stay green. Sometimes a Potassium deficiency is made worse by overwatering.

Sometimes the burn can appear pale, bleached or yellow, instead of brown.

 

Potassium deficiencies are commonly mistaken for other nutrient problems!

Sometimes the first symptoms of a potassium deficiency look a lot like nutrient burn. One difference is the edges of the leaves will also start turning brown, where nutrient burn usually only affects the tips. And unlike with nutrient burn the leaves of a potassium deficiency turn yellow in the margins, especially near the burn edges.

Please note, keeping your grow lights too close, for example with powerful LEDs and HPS grow lights can give your plants "sunburn" even if the temperature is cool! This can sometimes look like exactly like a potassium deficiency when the true problem is your grow lights are too close to your leaves.

Solution: Sometimes a potassium deficiency (like all deficiencies) can be triggered by stressful conditions, such as overwatering, heat, transplant, and may clear up on its own after the period of stress is over. If you only see one or two affected leaves near the bottom of the plant, and the problem isn't spreading, there might not be much to worry about.

Firstly, make sure it's not light burn. When a plant is kept too close to the grow lights, it can get light burn which looks almost exactly like a potassium deficiency. If you're using powerful lights like an LED or MH/HPS, consider moving the light away a few inches further away to see if that stops the problem from spreading. LEDs or MH/HPS should never be kept closer than 12" away, and most models should be kept further.

Secondly, adjust the pH to the correct range and use a good source of nutrients. The reason most growers see potassium deficiencies is because potassium is best absorbed at lower pH ranges. When the pH gets too high, your plant may exhibit signs of a potassium deficiency even if it's physically there near the roots.

In soil, potassium is best absorbed by the roots in the 6.0 - 7.0 pH range

In hydro or coco, potassium is best absorbed by the roots in the 5.5 - 6.5 pH range

Most growers don't need to add more nutrients if their leaves are experiencing a nutrient deficiency. In fact, most growers have actually already given plenty of potassium to their plants, whether they meant to or not. Easing off on these potassium based nutrients could be of benefit in this case. If you're using quality soil or good quality nutrients, you probably don't need to worry about adding more potassium.

Potassium deficiencies are generally more likely to appear when a grower is using heavily filtered or reverse osmosis (RO) water to feed plants, but as long as you're giving your plants a good source of nutrients, you should be fine.

 

Leaf Colour: 

  • Edges appear brown or burnt

  • Pale colour leaves

  • Yellow leaves - lower, older leaves

  • Yellowing between veins

  • Veins of leaves stay green

  • Brown or dark spots

 

Leaf Symptoms: 

  • Lower leaves / older growth affected

  • Leaf edges appear burnt

  • Leaf tips appear burnt

  • Leaf tips die

  • Yellowing between veins

  • Veins of leaves stay green

  • Spots

  • Old leaves dropping off

  • Slow growth

  • Twisted growth

  • Abnormal growth

  • Leaves curl under

  • Leaves curl upwards

 

Plant Symptoms: 

  • Old leaves dropping off

  • Slow growth

  • Twisted growth

  • Leaves curl under

  • Leaves curl upwards

  • Stretch (big spaces between nodes)

  • Too tall

 

Other Symptoms: 

  • Buds not progressing

HELPFUL PRODUCTS

PHOSPHORUS DEFICIENCY

Problem: A phosphorus deficiency generally appears on leaves from the lower/older parts of the plant. The lower leaves may turn dark green or yellow, and start getting spots or big blotches that look brown, bronze or even a little blue. The leaves may thicken and curl, and the affected leaves feel stiff. Sometimes the stems of the plant turn bright red or purple, but not always.

Phosphorus deficiencies in the vegetative stage usually appear at the bottom of the plant on some of the oldest leaves, and will progressively climb up the plant if left unchecked. 

Most plants tend to love phosphorus in the flowering/budding stage and it is unlikely for a plant to get too much using standard nutrients. Nearly all flowering nutrients will come with an abundance of phosphorus for your plants. So if you're seeing a phosphorus deficiency while using standard nutrients, chances are you actually have a pH problem.

 

Phosphorus (P) is used by your plant in all phases of growth. It is one of the 3 major nutrients (N-P-K) listed on the front of most nutrient bottles, phosphorus being the second number that appears. 

Sometimes you will get a phosphorus deficiency, and the stems do not appear red or purple at all, or the colouring may not be pronounced so do not mistake natural reddish-purple coloured stems for a phosphorous deficiency!

When you notice that stems are turning red or purple starting from underneath, it may be a sign of a phosphorus deficiency only if accompanied by other symptoms. If the only symptom shown by your plant is red or purple stems, and you are not seeing any other signs of splotches or unhealthy leaves, the red or purple stems could be caused by the genetics of your plant, and sometimes, other forms of stress such as temperature.

 

Phosphorus is used heavily by plants in the flowering phase to produce buds, and is a crucial component of photosynthesis (turning light into energy for the plant). 

Some types of plant use much more phosphorus than others, or be more susceptible to a phosphorus deficiency. You may have plants in the exact same setup with only some of the plants showing signs of a phosphorus deficiency.

 

Solution: First of all, adjust pH to the correct range. Your plant may show signs of a phosphorus deficiency if the pH at the roots is not in the right range. That is because when the pH of your root zone is off, your plant cannot properly absorb phosphorus through its roots. Therefore the first step is to ensure that you have the correct pH for your growth medium.

Phosphorus is best absorbed by plants in soil at a root pH of 6.2 - 7.0, and in hydro at a root pH of 5.5 - 6.2.

Secondly, make sure to provide the right temperature for your plants to thrive. Cooler temperatures lower than 15°C, as well as large temperature swings, can make it harder for the plant to absorb phosphorus. Plants are therefore more likely to show signs of a phosphorus deficiency when the temperature drops too low, or if they go through a cold spell.

 

Lastly, give your plants the correct nutrients. Most growers have actually already given plenty of phosphorus to their plants since it is found abundantly in good quality soil and nutrients. However, even if you are giving phosphorus, it's important to give your plants the correct ratio of nutrients.

An excess of iron and zinc may cause the symptoms of a phosphorus deficiency by preventing the plant from being able to absorb phosphorus properly. If you believe there may be a buildup of nutrient salts in your growing medium (or if you are growing in hydro and have not recently flushed or changed your reservoir) you should make sure it's not an excess of other nutrients that is actually causing the phosphorus deficiency to appear. Flush your plant thoroughly with properly pH'd water containing a regular dose of nutrients including phosphorus, or completely change your reservoir if you believe that an excess of nutrient salts may be causing the phosphorus deficiency.

 

Sources of phosphorus:

  • Bat guano (phosphorus is readily available, especially if made into a tea)

  • Bone or blood meal (takes quite a bit of time to break down in soil unless made into a tea first)

  • Worm castings or worm tea

  • Soft Rock Phosphate 

  • Fish meal 

  • Crabshell

  • Most "bloom" or "flowering" nutrients contain high levels of phosphorus to aid in flower production, and phosphorus from a liquid nutrient is one of the most readily available forms of phosphorus you can provide to your plants

 

If you've tried everything else, then you may try adding a higher percentage of phosphorus to your feeding schedule and see if that helps clear up the problem for your plant. Most nutrient systems will carry and abundance of phosphorus, especially in budding/flowering formulas, so it is unlikely that you will see signs of a phosphorus deficiency before other nutrient problems when using normal nutrient systems (as long as you keep your root pH in the correct range and prevent the plants from getting cold or being overwatered). If you've got very high powered lights, or if your plants are growing in direct sunlight, they may be going through a lot more phosphorus in the flowering stage than average and may need you to provide extra phosphorus to make sure plants thrive.

Just remember that if there's no actual phosphorus deficiency currently appearing on your plant, adding more phosphorus is probably not going to help plants grow better - in fact adding too much phosphorus may actually hurt your plants by preventing the uptake of other nutrients! While it's difficult to overdose your plants on phosphorus, adding too much compared to other nutrients will often cause other strange & unexpected deficiencies to appear.

Leaf Colour: 

  • Edges appear brown or burnt

  • Pale colour leaves

  • Yellow leaves - new growth

  • Yellow leaves - lower, older leaves

  • Dark or purple leaves

  • Black or grey patches on leaves

  • Red or pink colour on leaves

  • Brown or dark spots

  • Mottling / mosaic pattern

 

Leaf Symptoms: 

  • Upper leaves / newer growth affected

  • Lower leaves / older growth affected

  • Small inner leaves affected

  • Leaf edges appear burnt

  • Leaf tips appear burnt

  • Leaf tips die

  • Thick growth tips

  • Red stems

  • Spots

  • Mottling / mosaic

  • Old leaves dropping off

  • Slow growth

  • Twisted growth

  • Abnormal growth

  • Leaves curl under

 

Plant Symptoms: 

  • Red or purple stems

  • Weak stems

  • Old leaves dropping off

  • Slow growth

  • Twisted growth

  • Leaves curl under

  • Too short

 

Root Symptoms: 

  • Slow growing

 

Other Symptoms: 

  • Buds not progressing

HELPFUL PRODUCTS

PowerPlant Heat Shield
pH Down 1L
Essentials pH Meter
Show More
Canna Mono Nitrogen
CX Mighty Grow
Essentials pH Meter
Show More
NITROGEN DEFICIENCY

Problem: A nitrogen deficiency will cause the older, lower leaves on your plant to turn yellow, wilt away and eventually die.

The yellow leaves of a nitrogen deficiency may show signs of brown, and they will usually become soft and sort of "fold" in, before possibly turning crispy but ultimately falling off on their own.

If the yellowing leaves are at the top of your plant and mostly new growth, then you probably don't have a nitrogen deficiency. Nitrogen deficiencies always affect the oldest, lowest leaves first.

Nitrogen is a mobile nutrient, which means it can move throughout the plant as needed. Plants needs nitrogen to keep leaves green and make energy from light. All new leaves get plenty of nitrogen to make them green and help with photosynthesis. The leaves that get the most light are the newest, youngest leaves, so the plant "wants" to give those leaves priority for getting light.

If new leaves aren't getting enough nitrogen, the plant will start to "steal" nitrogen from the older, lower leaves, so that it can give it to newer leaves. This is what causes the yellowing and wilting of a nitrogen deficiency.

 

It's relatively normal for your plant's leaves to start turning yellow towards the end of your flowering cycle as the plant becomes nitrogen deficient while creating buds and fruits.

However, if your plant is losing lower leaves fast due to yellowing ("climbing" up the plant from the bottom), especially in the vegetative stage before plant is making buds, you have a problem that you will need to fix as soon as possible.

You don't want a nitrogen deficiency in the vegetative stage!

 

If you notice your lower leaves turning yellow in the vegetative stage or in the beginning part of the flowering stage, your plant may be experiencing a nitrogen deficiency which will need to be treated.

It's normal to lose a few yellow leaves off the bottom of your plant here and there, especially with very big plants. But if you are losing a significant amount of yellow leaves, and the yellowing seems to be moving up the plant quickly, then you have a problem.

 

As a grower, you're interested in how much nitrogen to give your plants at what time. The ratio of nitrogen to other nutrients has a huge effect on growth and bud formation.

In the vegetative stage your plant will require higher levels of nitrogen.

Most complete plant foods contain high levels of nitrogen (N). These nutrient system tend to work well in the vegetative stage.

In the flowering stage, your plants require lower levels of nitrogen.

It’s extra important to find a nutrient system with lower levels of nitrogen for the last part of your plant’s life. Many “Bloom” or "Flowering" style base nutrients are just the ticket.

 

It's normal for plants to show signs of a nitrogen deficiency as the plant gets close to harvest. This is actually a good thing! Too much nitrogen can actually prevent proper flowering, and can reduce the overall taste and smell of your plant. This is why all "bloom" and flowering nutrient formulas are relatively low in nitrogen.

So don't sweat it if you see your plants showing some signs of nitrogen deficiency late in the flowering stage. Relatively low levels of nitrogen in the late flowering stage helps promote proper bud development and will increase your yields.

 

Solution: You can find many pre-mixed nutrients which contain nitrogen or you could use nitrate of soda or organic fertiliser which are both good sources of nitrogen. In fact almost all plant nutrients of any kind will include nitrogen. If you haven't been providing any nutrient to your plants, try supplementing your regular nutrients with a bit more nitrogen and see if the plant starts recovering.

If you've already been using nutrients, then you probably don't have a nitrogen deficiency. If you're seeing the signs of spreading nitrogen deficiency even a week or two giving nitrogen to your plants through nutrients, then you need to figure out what else is causing the yellowing so you can stop it.

Sometimes you can get the signs of a nitrogen deficiency if the pH at the plant root zone is too low, even if the nitrogen is there. This is because when the pH at the roots is not right, your plant roots can't properly absorb nutrients. If you aren't sure about your root pH.

Nitrogen is especially important during the vegetative stage of your plants. As your plants start flowering, they will need lower amounts of nitrogen.

Nitrogen is one of the 3 nutrients that is included in almost every kind of plant food.

When looking at plant nutrients, you'll almost always see 3 numbers listed, like 3-12-6 or 5-10-5. These numbers represent the percentage of Nitrogen (N), Phosphorous (P) and Potassium (K) contained in the bottle. Just about all plant life on Earth needs these 3 elements to grow.

The very first number, always displays the proportion of nitrogen in the nutrient bottle compared to the other 2 nutrients (Phosphorus and Potassium respectively).

The reason nitrogen is in all plant nutrient formulations is because it's vital to plant processes. 

Leaf Colour: 

  • Pale colour leaves

  • Yellow leaves - lower, older leaves

  • Yellowing between veins

 

Leaf Symptoms: 

  • Lower leaves / older growth affected

  • Yellowing between veins

  • Old leaves dropping off

  • Wilting / drooping

 

Plant Symptoms: 

  • Old leaves dropping off

HELPFUL PRODUCTS